Jason Becker Lick Over Jazz Chord Progression (Video) and More

The video above is my first post to my YouTube Channel, Guitar 10000 (https://youtu.be/jS33j5eESHU). It’s the first of many I hope to post, documenting my journey to become a performing musician in fifteen years (when I retire). It’s a Jason Becker lick over a jazz chord progression.  It’s a fun little lick.  It was a great exercise, too, for working with a backing track.

Away a While, But Still Learning!
Despite the fact I haven’t posted in a long time, I’ve remained hard at work learning how to play guitar.  I’ve also been hard at work ironing out a solid practice routine (there’s so much to learn, it’s easy to get lost in the scramble to do too many things).  In addition, I’ve been working hard at learning how to record and edit audio and video.

Last month, I joined a group on Facebook called, Play Jazz Guitar.  It’s helped immensely. The group’s founder/moderator, Matt Warnock, teaches guitar through song.  That may sound like a no-brainer to folks, but it’s not easy to do.  Matt provides a structure and depth to learning a new jazz standard each month.  What’s more, this group is a friendly, safe environment in which to learn with one another. Players regularly post videos and offer positive, constructive feedback.

Updating My Workout Routine and Stats
I’ll take some time tomorrow to update my workout routine and stats. Though I’ve not posted, I’ve averaged 2+ hours of practice on most days. I’m on winter break (I’m a teacher) and have been able to put in 4+ hours on most days. It’s been a productive break!

Happy New Year!

Masterclass: Tommy Emmanuel – Thumbpicking

I got turned on to Tommy Emmanuel several years ago. In what context, I don’t remember. But what I do remember is being drawn to his high-energy virtuosity.  His playing blew me away. As a fan of fingerpicking technique (I much prefer the fingers over a pick), I appreciate what he teaches in this video. As a re-learner of guitar, I’m more keenly appreciative of what he says between 10:00 and 10:45 of the video. What follows is an excerpt of what he says during these forty-five seconds:

“…keep it simple as long as possible, don’t try and rush ahead to more difficult songs just because you think it might be more exciting, you’ve got to give yourself a chance to build up this technique and to understand it — this is all new stuff…”

-Tommy Emmanuel, Thumbpicking Masterclass

While what he says is nothing new to me, for whatever reason at this stage in my life it finally makes sense. I’ve now touched on the value of going slow to go fast several times. In the past, I used to think I was trading-off the frustration of practicing slowly for the frustration of trying to tackle a challenging song. I always erred on the side of tackling the challenging song. I’m not sure, ultimately, that the fruits born from this tree were more ripe and tasteful than the fruits born from the other tree. I’m beginning to experience, however, that the tree rooted in slow, deliberate practice while grounded in technique and theory is already having a profound impact on my playing.

What I love most about this video, and why I’m sharing, is just how elegant Tommy Emmanuel’s instruction is given his virtuosity. I’ve seldom seen such instructional clarity from some who just “gets it”. Whether you’re a fan of fingerpicking, great instruction, Tommy Emmanuel, phenomenal guitar playing or some combination thereof, here’s something for you to enjoy.

Make it a phenomenal day!

Days 9, 10, 11, 12 – Slowing Down to Go Fast

A long time ago, when I started playing, an instructor told me, “Use the metronome. Go slow! Start at 60 BPM and play 8th notes until you play them with clarity. Then jump 5 BPM per iteration until you can play at 200 BPM with no mistakes.” He told me this would take time. I tried this for about 3 days until I could no longer bear playing slowly. I didn’t feel like I was making progress and I felt like I played with more mistakes than I did when I played by feel. Furthermore, I found myself always tense.Guitar playing wasn’t fun, it was painful.

I felt like a failure despite the fact I could otherwise play the guitar decently. My instructor had convinced me that unless I’d learn to take my time, play with accuracy, and through this slow pace learn the neck (rather than memorize tablature), I’d be a solid guitar player.  Because I could play Silent Lucidity, Stairway to Heaven, Tears in Heaven and several other songs decently, I felt I was a solid guitar player already.  I, however, despite my best efforts, remained stuck.  I refused to do the things most instructors, books, and guitar players would tell you to do — study the guitar!

I didn’t know what study the guitar meant.

As far as I new, it meant slow down.  Slowing down is key to a lot of things, but I’ve come to learn that studying the guitar boils down to getting technique under my fingers and theory in my head so that I can get my hands to do what I want, when I want, and where I want.  I must admit that studying guitar, despite its espoused value, was not something I did well. I spent most of my time learning songs and noodling. There’s some value to this, yes, but because I wasn’t doing right things, I lacked the chops that would otherwise allow me to play the way I envisioned myself playing.

Progress these past two weeks has been better than expected. I’ve been committed to picking up the guitar every day.  With the exception of one day in the past two weeks, I’ve had guitar in hand every day — most days for an hour or more. What’s been crazy is the passion I’ve had for playing. In the past, I could easily walk by my guitar in favor of something else, with the understanding that I’d come back to it later.  Later seldom happened, however.

Not only am I picking up the guitar every day and spending time with it, I’ve become increasingly structured in my practice regimen. Every day I spend time working on technique, theory, and repertoire.  I work on them in this order.  I limit the material I play through each phase of practice so that I can work on it slowly and intently.  I’m very methodical about playing perfectly.  I aim to both pick and fret every note precisely; no buzzes, no missed notes, no muted strings.

This degree of attention has allowed me to become more relaxed.  As a result, I’m playing faster and more fluidly than I’ve ever played — in just two weeks. Because I’m paying close attention to learning the fretboard and the theory that underlies it, my fingers go where my mind and ears tell them to go.  This has never previously been my reality.  I’d always relied on the memorization of tabs over long hours of practice. Now, when my mind hears something, my fingers know how to follow.  I don’t have a seamless ability to do this yet, but the mere fact that I can hear things in my head and put them to work on the fretboard is a major accomplishment.

I can’t express to you how much I wish I had listened to my instructor(s) years ago. To dwell on this, however, would be fruitless and could, in the long run, be self-defeating. I’m simply enjoying the fact that I feel like I understand what I’m doing.  I feel like I know how to shape the path toward becoming a competent, performance-worthy guitar player.

10/30, 10/31, 11/1, 11/2, 11/3, and 11/4 Time: 8 hours

Total Time: 20 hours

Time Remaining: 9,980 hours